Newsday March 2, 1997


Send this picture as an ecard

 

 

 


Send this picture as an ecard


Send this picture as an ecard

Send this picture as an ecard

Send this picture as an ecard

April 9, 2008


Send this picture as an ecard

Raksha Bandhan (Rakhi)

On the occasion of Indian festival Raksha Bandhan, also known as Rakhi, sisters tie a sacred thread, known as Rakhi, on their brother’s wrist as a symbol of fondness and sisterly affection towards them. They pray to God for protection and long life of their brothers.

Raksha Bandhan actually means a bond of protection. In Hindi, “Raksha” means protection and “Bandhan” means bond. So the brothers vow to protect their sisters from harm that could befall them. Rakhi is joyfully celebrated in all parts of India. Sisters bring sweets for brothers who shower sisters with gifts or cash in return, followed by the entire family gathering around for a feast.

The festival of Rakhi or Raksha Bandhan has its roots in the ancient rituals of India when women used to tie Rakhi to anyone going on an important mission. They would tie Rakhi on the wrists of kings and warriors leaving for war, wishing them success and praying for their safe return.

Once a woman ties Rakhi on the wrist of any man, he accepts it as a vow to protect her as a sister. There are several instances quoted in the Indian history. It is said that when Alexander invaded India in 326 B.C., his wife tied a Rakhi to King Porus and in return, Porus promised to protect her, and not to kill Alexander in case of latter’s defeat in the war.

There are several other stories when the vows of Raksha Bandhan went beyond religious divide. The most famous of them is the story of the Hindu Queen Karnavati of Chittor in the Indian state of Rajasthan, who sent a Rakhi to the Mughal emperor Humayun, calling him a brother and asking for help, to save her kingdom from the invasion of Bahadur Shah, another Muslim king. Emperor Himayun kept his promise.

This festival has also a profound social message for all responsible individuals that they should live in harmonious coexistence as brothers and sisters in society. The festival is also considered as a day to enjoy with all the family members. It invites lots of happiness in the family where everyone comes together to celebrate beautiful occasion of Rakhi.

With the communication revolution of the last few years, E-Rakhis and Rakhi-cards through internet have also become popular along with self-made Rakhi-threads and Rakhis through mail conveying personal feelings of the siblings.

 


Send this picture as an ecard


Send this picture as an ecard

HomeTopicsArticlesDynamicDivasDivaTipsSubmitanArticle

Top of Form

Bottom of Form

Topics » Family » Relationships

Go Call Your Siblings on April 10

by Dr, Karen Gail Lewis April 5, 2011

Email

Print

Share

You grew up with brothers and sisters. You played with them; you fought with them. They tattled on you (or you tattled on them). Mom liked you more; Dad liked them more.

You’re grown up now. Do you still have the same squabbles? Can you write the conversations before they even occur? Do you get along well – except for certain topics? Do you speak to your siblings now? And, are they still alive so you can speak to them?

In 1998, Claudia Evart decided to do something special. She had grown up with a brother and a sister – both of them dead long before they should have been. From being part of a set of siblings, she became an only child. Whatever her childhood experiences with her brother and sister, she took her loss and her memories and translated them into action. She started working towards a National Siblings Day (www.SiblingsDay.org.)

She says, “Mother’s Day and Father’s Day honor the living parents.”

She wants a day to honor the people who grew up with you. This would be the people who shared your bedroom, your clothes, who fought over the same toys. She also wants a day to memorialize those siblings who are no longer in your life. She picked April 10, her sister’s birthday.

More than 2/3 thirds of the states have recognized National Siblings Day and Evart is hot on the trail of having President Bush make it a national proclamation.

Evart turned whatever her feelings about her siblings in childhood into a positive action for herself – and others. What do you do with your childhood feelings about your brothers and sisters?

“Last Tuesday, like every first Tuesday of the month for the past 12 years, I got in my red Subura and drove four hours straight north on I-95 to Denny’s. Why? Because my sister Chrissy drove south on I-95 for the same four hours to meet me.” Robin grins, “I wouldn’t miss these Tuesdays even if the Queen of England were coming to town. We had lunch and spent the day together, poking around shops, exploring new areas, but mostly sitting and talking.

Robin and Chrissy, midi-life married women, have arranged their work schedule so they can have this special time together every month.

“We weren’t always this close. There were 30 plus years when we wouldn’t go so far as our own backyards to spend time together. Mom had always wanted us to be close, but when we were little, she’s 15 months older than I, we fought over everything; I always ended up crying. When we were teenagers, she was nasty when I borrowed her clothes, her make-up, or her jewelry. True, I didn’t always ask first, but after all, I was a teenager!

“After college, we went our own ways. We got together twice a year at our parents’ home for Thanksgiving and Passover. These were the only times our kids got to see and play with each other.

“But then, something changed at our mother’s funeral; it was almost magical. As we stood over her casket, it was as if her hand came up and grabbed us and made us hug. That hug changed our lives.”

Chrissy had never heard of National Siblings Day. “I think it’s a great idea, at least now. How would I have felt before Mom died? I’m ashamed to say, but I think I would have laughed. Why would I want to celebrate a day for a person whom I didn’t really care about?”

Ninety-five percent of Americans grow up with at least one brother or sister. That’s a huge statistic, yet so little attention is paid to such a significant relationship. Most adults get on with their lives, ignoring their siblings or taking their existence for granted, like Chrissy and Robin before their mother’s death.

Don’t take your siblings for granted. Whether you would choose them as friends, they are yours for life. On April 10, send a card, call, or email them to thank them for being your brother or sister.

Dr. Karen Gail Lewis has been a marriage and family therapist for more than 39 years. She specializes in working with adult siblings and with singles. She has offices in Cincinnati, Ohio and Washington, DC. She also runs UNIQUE RETREATS FOR WOMEN. She is author of seven books, including Why Don’t You Understand? A Gender Relationship Dictionary.For more information, she can be contacted at 513-542-0646 or DrKarenGailLewis.com.

 

You and Your Siblings –

Don’t Let The Bad Times Continue To Roll

    You grew up with brothers and sisters.  You played with them; you fought with them.  They tattled on you (or you tattled on them).  Mom liked .you more; Dad liked them more.
You’re grown up now.  Do you still have the same squabbles?  Can you write the conversations before they even occur?  Do you get along well – except for certain topics?  Do you speak to your siblings now?  And, are they still alive so you can speak to them?
Claudia Evart grew up with a brother and a sister – both of them dead long before they should have been.  From being part of a set of siblings, she became an only child.  Whatever her childhood experiences with her brother and sister, in 1998, she decided to do something special; she took her loss and her memories and translated them into action.  She started working towards a National Siblings Day, now held on April 10.
She says, “Mother’s Day and Father’s Day honor the living parents.”  She wants a day to honor the people who grew up with you.  This would be the people who shared your bedroom, your clothes, who fought over the same toys.   She also wants a day to memorialize those siblings who are no  longer in your life.  She picked April 10, her sister’s birthday.  Governors,
Congress and Presidents (from Clinton, Bush, and now Obama) are working on ratifying this day.
Evart turned whatever her feelings about her siblings in childhood into a positive action for herself – and others. What do you do with your childhood feelings about your brothers and sisters?
“Last Tuesday, like every first Tuesday of the month for the past 12 years, I got in my red Subaru and drove four hours straight north on I-95 to Denny’s.  Why?  Because my sister Chrissy drove south on I-95 for the same four hours to meet me.”  Robin grins, “I wouldn’t miss these Tuesdays even if the Queen of England were coming to town.  We had lunch and spent the day together, poking around shops, exploring new areas, but mostly sitting and talking.
Robin and Chrissy, mid-life married women, have arranged their work schedule so they can have this special time together every month.
“We weren’t always this close. There were 30 plus years when we wouldn’t go so far as our own backyards to spend time together.  Mom had always wanted us to be close, but when we were little, she’s 15 months older than I, we fought over everything; I always ended up crying. When we were
teenagers, she was nasty when I borrowed her clothes, her make-up, or her jewelry.  True, I didn’t always ask first, but after all, I was a teenager!

After college, we went our own ways. We got together twice a year at our parents’ home for Thanksgiving and Passover.  These were the only times our kids got to see and play with each other.

But then, something changed at our mother’s funeral; it was almost magical.  As we stood over her casket, it was as if her hand came up and grabbed us and made us hug.  That hug changed our lives.”

Chrissy had never heard of National Siblings Day.  “I think it’s a great idea, at least now. How would I have felt before Mom died?  I’m ashamed to say, but I think I would have laughed.  Why would I want to celebrate a day for a person whom I didn’t really care about?”

Joshua also had never heard about National Siblings Day.  “I have mixed feelings.  I rarely talk with my two sisters, only when they call me.

Would I like to be closer?  Maybe, but would I do anything to make it happen?  Probably no.  My brother though is another story.  I don’t like him.  I certainly don’t care if I never see him again.”

I ask, “If your brother called and said he was in serious trouble, or was really sick, and needed your help….”

He finishes my sentence, “Well, that would be different.  I’d be right there.”

“Why, if you don’t like him?”

“He’s my brother.”  Joshua grimaces as if thinking.  “I know that doesn’t’ make sense.  I’m not sure I can answer that, but we used to be real close when we were little.  Well, we fought a lot.  Rather, I used to beat him up.  He was an annoying pest.”

He stops, trying to make sense of his contradictions.  “I don’t know why, but I guess because he is my brother,” he repeats.  “I don’t like who he has become now, and I don’t really care about any of the three of them, but I wouldn’t want anything to happen to them. That doesn’t make a lot of sense, does it?”

Ninety-five percent of Americans grow up with at least one brother or sister.  That’s a huge statistic, yet so little attention is paid to such a significant relationship. Most adults get on with their lives, ignoring their

siblings or taking their existence for granted, like Joshua, and like Chrissy and Robin before their mother’s death.

If you have ignored your siblings, if you wish you were closer to your siblings, there are some things you can do now, before it’s too late, like it was for Claudia Evart.

1.  Write a letter to yourself, as if from your sibling, listing all the complaints you imagine your sibling has about you.   Doing this may help clarify your sibling’s perspective of you and why she feels angry at or hurt by you.

2.  Talk to your sibling about whatever insights you have gotten from your letter.  It will be easier for her to listen to your anger and hurt if she feels heard first.

3.  Sign up for a FREE teleseminar talk on understanding sibling conflicts and get more ideas for how to improve your relationship:

    (www.DrKGL.com/sib)

You may not miss your brother or sister now, you may be so angry you don’t care if you never speak to her (or him) again, but research shows that after age 65, siblings do become closer and have more contact.   So, why
wait.  And, certainly, don’t let the bad times continue until it’s too late to improve your relationship.  Remember your siblings on April 10, 2010, but then think about how differently you would like to feel about them by April 10, 2011.

Dr. Karen Gail Lewis, a marriage and family therapist  (39 years) and author of books on relationships, including her newest, Why Don’t You Understand? A Gender Relationship Dictionary (www.GenderDictionary.com).  She also specializes in adult siblings, including the free teleseminar mentioned above.  For 16 years, she has run Unique Retreats For Women.      She can be contacted at 513-542-0646 or www.DrKarenGailLewis.com.

 

He Said, She Said
by
Dr. Karen Gail Lewis, LISW, Ed.D.


Send this picture as an ecard

 

 

 

April 10th is National Siblings Day

You grew up with brothers, sisters. You played with them; you fought with them. They tattled on you (or you tattled on them). Mom liked you more; Dad liked them more.

You’re grown up now. Do you still have the same squabbles? Can you write the conversations before they even occur? Do you get along well except for certain topics? Do you speak to your siblings now? And, are they still alive so you can speak to them?

In 1998, Claudia Evart decided to do something special. She had grown up with a brother and a sister — both of them dead long before they should have been. From being part of a set of siblings, she became an only child. Whatever her childhood experiences with her brother and sister, she took her loss and her memories and translated them into action. She started working towards a National Siblings Day.

She says. “Mother’s Day and Father’s Day honor the living parents.
She wanted a day to honor the people who grew up with you. This would be the people who shared your bedroom, your clothes, who fought over the same toys — whether you were lucky enough to still have them alive in your life as well as to memorialize those who are no longer in your life. She picked April 10, her sister’s birthday.

Twenty-six states have recognized National Siblings Day and Evart is hot on the trail of having the President make it a national proclamation.

Evart turned her feelings about her siblings into a positive action for herself— and others. What do you do with your childhood feelings about your siblings?

“Last Tuesday, like every Tuesday for the past 12 years, I got in my car and drove four hours straight north on 1-95 to Denny’s. Why? Because my sister Chrissy drove south on 1-95 for the same four hours to meet me at Denny’s.” Robin grins, “I wouldn’t miss these Tuesdays even if the Queen of England were coming to town. We had lunch and spent the day together, poking around shops, exploring new areas, but mostly sitting and talking.

Robin and Chrissy, mid-life married women, have arranged their work schedule so they can have this special time together every week. ‘We weren’t always this close. There were 30 plus years when we wouldn’t go so far as our own backyards to spend time together. Mom had always wanted us to be close, but when we were little — she’s 15 months older than 1— we squabbled over everything; I always ended up crying. When we were teenagers, she was nasty when I borrowed her clothes, her make-up, and her jewelry. True, I didn’t always ask first, but after all, I was a teenager! After college, we went our own ways. We got together twice a year at our parents’ home for Thanksgiving and Passover. These were the only times our kids got to see and play with each other. But then, something changed at our mother’s funeral; it was almost magical. As we stood over our mother’s casket, it was as if her hand came up and grabbed us and made us hug. That hug changed our lives.”

Chrissy had never heard of National Siblings Day. “I think it’s a great idea — at least now. How would I have felt before Mom died? I’m ashamed to say, but I think I would have laughed. Why would I want to celebrate a day for a person whom I didn’t really care about?”

Joshua, also, had never heard about National Siblings Day.

“I rarely talk with my two sisters, only when they call me. Would I like to be closer? Maybe, but would I do anything to make it happen? Probably not. My brother though is another story. I don’t like him. I certainly don’t care if! never see him again.”

I ask, “If your brother called and said he was In serious trouble, or was really sick, and needed your help…”

He finishes my sentence for me. ‘Well, that would be different. I’d be right there.”

“Why, if you don’t like him?”

‘He’s my brother.” Joshua grimaces as if thinking. “I know that doesn’t make sense. I’m not sure I can answer that, but we used to be real close when we were little. We fought a lot; rather, I used to beat him up. He was an annoying pest.”

He stops, trying to make sense of his contradictions. “I don’t know why, but I guess because he is my brother” he repeats. “I don’t like who he has become now, and I don’t really care about any of the three of them, but I wouldn’t want anything to happen to them.

Ninety-five percent of Americans grow up with at least one brother or sister. That’s a huge statistic, yet so little attention is paid to such a significant relationship. Most adults get on with their lives, ignoring their siblings or taking their existence for granted.

Joyce knows what happens when you take a sibling for granted. “I come from a large family, there were 6 of us kids, and only three are left. That’s a lot of people to die so young. I wasn’t even close to my two younger brothers, but their deaths changed my view of my family and myself. We weren’t a family of 8 any more. The dinner table on holidays wasn’t so crowded any more. It’s little things like this that jump out and grab me, more so than the actual loss of my brothers. I instead of being a middle child, I’m the second oldest and only girl now.”

In hearing about April 10 as a day to honor or memorialize siblings, Joyce says, “I love the idea. I think I’ll do something special for Donny, Paul, and Gwen. Maybe I’ll write them a letter that they will never be able to see, or maybe I’ll plant a tree in my yard. I don’t know, but I certainly am going to think about it.”

Dr. Karen Gail Lewis is a marriage and family therapist in private practice in both Cincinnati and Washington, DC. Author of 6 books, her most recent one is With or Without A Man: Single Women Taking Control of Their Lives: She is currently working on a book about the sibling relationship as parents age and die. She runs weekend retreats for couples, single parents and adult siblings
From The Downtowner, Cincinnati, Ohio April 4, 2006.

 


Send this picture as an ecard

 


Send this picture as an ecard

 

 

 

 

North Miami Beach, Florida

Mar 29, 2006
DOUBLE-TAKE: Reality in a Musical about Siblings
by Phyllis Green

It’s amazing how often “We’re like sisters” and “He’s like a brother to me” has been said. And, how often would it happen that a show comes to town containing the very subject matter that has been the obsession and dream of this writer. Yes, Siblings Day, April 10th, is just around the corner; Little Women, The Musical has just played at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts in Ft. Lauderdale; and both celebrate the infinite bond that is known to siblings! More will be explained regarding this masterpiece project that was started by native New Yorker, Claudia Evart, so please read on.

But first, it is the musical Little Women, based on the 1868 novel by Louisa May Alcott that sings the story of those four devoted March sisters: Meg, the eldest, of virtue and compassion; Jo, the outspoken, independent heroine of the tale; Beth, the musically inclined, and Amy, the romantic and youngest of the siblings. Played respectively by Renee Brna, Susan Spencer, Autumn Hurlbert and Gwen Hollander, they all held true to the character’s personalities intended by the author. Whether motivated by equality, ambitions, sentiment, personal desire or contentment, these siblings all maintained their own identities while sharing the strength of their unbreakable bond. With a theme that strong, it actually could touch the realness of life. But however, it is theatre, and as such, there are the costumes by Catherine Zuber, a bit too enchantingly lovely for hand-me-downs from sister to sister; the forgettably sweet musical numbers by Jason Howland and Mindi Dickstein; albeit the innocuous sets by Derek McLane; this show provided one high point of enactment on the shore at Cape Cod: Beth and Jo’s poignant duet “Some Things are Meant to Be” and their interpretation of handling a kite that has soared up in the sky.

The biggest quagmire here is the casting of the great recording, concert and theatre star, Maureen McGovern, an incredible talent with the voice of an angel, lost in the one-dimensional role of Marmee, the matriarch of the family. More is the pity that if star power was necessary, and indeed the casting of this magnificent balladeer was certainly the draw, then it surely would have been more redeeming to place the plum role of Jo in the artistic talents of some real heavy hitter. One last comment, conversely to prove how hard it is though, not to be moved by the background of this production. In a performance at the Virginia Theater, when McGovern sang the mournful “Days of Plenty,” a teacher related that one of her seventh-grader’s in the audience, who had just lost her brother, found the strength she needed to “not stop your life because you’ve lost someone; you go on to honor that life.” Said McGovern in an interview: “They can’t pay you enough money for something as wonderful as that.”

Which brings us full circle: to Siblings Day, April 10th. It’s REAL! At the time of this writing, the aforementioned Ms. Evart, the Founder of The Siblings Day Foundation, a tax-exempt non-profit organization dedicated to having people set aside that day each year to celebrate and connect with their brothers and sisters, has been in contact with many prominent politicians including Senators Clinton, Schumer, Kennedy, as well as President and Mrs. Bush, in hopes of acquiring a Presidential Proclamation to make this a National Holiday just like Mother’s and Father’s Day. Thus far, doors have been opening; so share a phone call, a lunch date, a hug, a remembrance, anything, to recognize that unequivocal bond with big bro or little sis. Those who are an only child can join in by selecting another relative or friend with whom to celebrate.

To help you in your quest, log on to www.siblingsdayfoundation.org and send that message of love. By helping yourself, you’ll help that amazing little woman, Claudia Evart, the modern day Louisa May Alcott, in her quest to make April 10th a REAL commemorative holiday.

 

 

North Miami Beach, Florida

February 2006 •Vol. 26 – No. 01
Imagine All the People Who Can Celebrate

by Phyllis Green
Special to EN&V

Love is in the air around about this time, and it truly is meaningful when it can be shared with not only one’s spouse or significant other, but in relationships equally as strong; as with parent and child, and the most constant of all, that particular love between brothers and sisters. For it is with siblings that the very basis of all family tradition and connection evokes a continuation for generations to come. It is with siblings that most of us have garnered our strengths. And it is here that the possibility of something monumental can happen!

Bottom Line: A Special Day each year dedicated to celebrating one’s siblings; a day where brothers and sisters reflect upon each other over a lunch date or phone call; in some cases, a day of truce and more understanding; for many other, a day of love; for some, a day when those departed are remembered; and in all cases, a day when attention is paid to that unequivocal bond like no other.

This is the concept of a woman whom I have never met, Claudia Evart, a native New Yorker, who, after losing both of her siblings, wants people across the country to set aside April 10th each year to celebrate their brothers and sisters. I first got in touch with her after reading about her plans in a short article in the Miami Herald in April of 2000. How ironic, how sad, that is the month that I lost two of my precious siblings.

For all her efforts thus far, a Siblings Day Foundation has been created with recognitions from many of our country’s leaders including President Bill Clinton, Senator Edward Kennedy, Governors George Pataki, Tom Ridge, Christine Todd Whitman, Tommy Thompson, Jeb Bush, Mayors Rudolph Giuliani, and Michael Bloomberg, and supportive Proclamations from 26 states.  We have been brainstorming via long distance, and people are joining this bandwagon. But it’s not enough. In order for this to become a National Holiday, like Mother’s, Father’s and Valentine’s Day, the President and Congress must sign on. Media and Celebrity and Retail Merchandising must join Government, in order to put this phenomenal celebration in effect.

This mission is extraordinary; and the best idea I have ever heard in my entire life; and its success is dependant upon reader response. Popular opinion says this is a “slam dunk, chip shot” to happen; but it cannot be done without your input. For starters, you can contact this writer here at GREENSTR39@aol.com or Claudia in New York at siblingsday@earthlink.net. We are on the threshold of something incredible; and indeed definitive of the word “love.”

 


Send this picture as an ecard

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Other Published Articles

Our story about Siblings Day was published in many newspapers including : Free Estonian Word April 10, 2014; Diva Toolbox April 5, 2011; The Caymanian Compass April 9, 2009, Entertainment News & Views March 29, 2006, February 2006; December 16-22, 2005; Newsday (3/2/97); New York Post & Chicago Tribune (5/20/97); Dallas Morning News (4/4/00); Washington Post in the Kids Post Section (4/10/00), Miami Herald 4/07/00); St Paul Pioneer Press 04/07/00; Orange County Register Newspaper (04/10 /00); and several others.

Broadcasted Interviews

Television and/or radio shows where the Siblings Day Foundation were featured included Arlington Independent Media TV Channel 69, Arlington, Virginia, 2005; Voice of America in Washington, D.C. in 1997, 2001 and 2002; CITN Television in the Grand Cayman, B.W.I. in 1999 and 1998.

Radio shows included WKTRT in Texas, WYHY Y95 in Rockford, IL in 2002; Light 105.7, St. Catharines, Ontario, Alice 102.7 FM in Fresno, CA., WKHM Radio in Jackson, MI in 2001; Joe Franklin Show 710 WOR AM NYC, KXCV, Maryville, MO in 2000; Radio Cayman in the Grand Cayman in 1998; Joe Daley Show WBNR Radio, Beacon, NY in 1999 and 1998 and WOBB in Albany, GA in 1997 and many others.

 

© 1995 to 2015 All Rights Reserved